…and so to Kimbolton NZ

From Auckland my journey has taken me through the largely pastoral landscapes of central N. Island, through the land of hot springs, geysers and mudbaths, and in the last couple of days through the volcanic heartland where the landscapes betray both its recent eruptive past, as well as its current role as a winter playground for skiers and snowboarders.
Today’s 120km route took me over the ominously named Desert Road, a road that crosses the 65km expanse of the volcanic plateau, with no services or watering holes its entire length. This gave me much food for thought, and much thought about food (and drink, of course).
Leaving Turangi, a town on the southern shore of NZ’s biggest lake (Taupo), 10km into the ride had me climbing persistently to over 1100 metres (3500ft) for about 90mins. When the downhill eventually came, it was elusive at first. Cyclists sometimes find themselves in a visual and physical conundrum. Visually, they are convinced they are going downhill, but their legs tell a different story. There is nothing more frustrating than pedalling laboriously down an apparent incline.
But, then the real descent happened, along with tail wind, and it was scarily fast and went on for 12km. I found myself having to apply the brakes at the unsteadiness of 65kph (40mph) especially with luggage spurring on the downhill speed.
When I finally pulled into the first cafe in 65km at Waiouru, I was beset by 2 donors giving me $10 & $20 respectively. The latter was given by the young waitress who said she had never heard of anyone cycling the Desert Road, and I deserved every cent.
I am typing this post on my phone (using the one-fingered method) sitting in my tent after dusk in a remote campsite within earshot of a swift tumbling river, the very one I was bathing in a couple of hours ago. The campsite is so simple that the caretaker may come in the morning to collect my $7 fee. So simple, in fact, that there was no food to buy for an evening meal. Prospect? Go hungry until the morning. Result? A nearby couple, David and Maggie (both ex-pat Brits) took pity on me and included an extra portion in their evening meal. I continue to be astounded at the kindness showed to me in so many ways.
Tomorrow will bring me to Kimbolton NZ, where I am to meet the Headmistress of Kimbolton School. This encounter will be a story for a future post, but I have in my saddlebag some official letters of greeting from the Chair and Clerk to the Parish Council to present to the people of Kimbolton NZ, who are largely unaware this is going to happen. And it will all start with a cup of tea and piece of cake at the only cafe in the village.
Watch this space!

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About Frank Burns

My journeys around the world are less about riding a bicycle, and more about what happens when I get off the bicycle. Click on the Personal Link below to visit my webpages.

Posted on February 1, 2013, in New Zealand End-to-End 3000kms and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 23 Comments.

  1. Fanbloodytastik !!!!

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  2. Inspirational as always, Frank!

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  3. Really enjoying the blog, Frank. What a tremendous adventure. So impressed. Glad you have the energy to make to blog as it helps us share your experiences. Donations from us are on their way. Keep it up. Lots of love, Alison and Dominic. Xx

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  4. Leopoldo Castro

    Simply epic…

    And the posts are grrreat, too!

    Keep up the good work, and I wish you the best of lucks!!!

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  5. Great Pics!

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  6. When the locals tell you that you just did something nobody can recall anyone have done before, then you’ve managed quite a feet! Thank you for your perseverence with one fingered typing. That is no small feet either.

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  7. Thank you both so much, A&D. Your comment is thr first one I open up at 6am as I crawl out my little tent. Keep them coming. There are many more challenging roads ahead.

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  8. Gracias Leopoldo. So glad you can join me on this journey!

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  9. Thanks Peter. So glad you are ‘peeking’ in on this journey.

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  10. Thanks Steve. I do appreciate those observations.

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  11. I just noticed how atrocious my spelling is. Yikes! And I have no excuse – all ten fingers are at my disposal on a very nice keyboard!

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  12. All those beautiful pictures! And the water!!! Good luck with your meeting tomorrow!

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  13. Sheila Cakebread

    Frank, so impressed that you have the energy to write a blog after cycling 120km. Looks as though the weather is being kind to you, did you pack sunscreen?

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  14. …..nothing less than SPF50!

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  15. The meeting has just happened and it was a great success. Thanks!

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  16. Don’t beat yourself up Steve. It happens to me all the time……..

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  17. Thank you for keeping us entertained with the blog of your trip. Any had any encounters with the local wildlife? David

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  18. Frank, if you’re passing through Blenheim in the South Island my partner and I offer a comfy Hobbit-hole and a good meal (she’s a great cook!) if you’re looking for a free stopover. Been following your blog awhile now and find it very inspirational! Great stuff!

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  19. ….dead possums, tuis, NZ magpies, mosquitoes…….and sandflies to come on S Island

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  20. Fantastic offer! Probably won’t need the bed, but maybe a coffee and snack Wed late morning.(6th)

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  21. That’d be great, Frank. Send me an email at fantasticbookblog at gmail dot com and I’ll give you my contact details. Daniel.

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  22. Thank you for stopping in at the Save the Children office in Wellington. My daughter works there and called to tell me of your visit. I’ve enjoyed the blog, having just traveled through the north island (Wellington, Lake Taupo, Rotorua, Auckland) in November for a 160K ride around Lake Taupo with my daughter and her husband. What a beautiful part of the world! I am envious of your trip and inspired by your efforts and the generosity of the Kiwis. Bob in Virginia

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  23. Bob, it was a pleasure meeting your daughter & all the staff. Such a positive bunch of people!

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