Japan day 34

Japan day 34
Wakkanai-Cape Soya-Wakkanai 77km
Wakkanai has that feeling of a town at the end of the line. Though it lacks nothing in terms of modernity, it’s evident that nobody passes through here on their way to somewhere else…..unless, of course, you’re a daft cyclist on your way to Cape Soya. In the summer, there will certainly be a steady flow of travellers heading out to Ristri and Rebun, two islands to the north west that I will visit before I leave. But today’s brief was to finish this Cape-to-Cape journey, some 32km to the NE, and still with the favourable wind of yesterday. But this sortie out to Cape Soya had a return journey to Wakkanai…..in other words, a day of mixed feelings about the wind. (Now some of you may be wondering why this man doesn’t just catch a bus back to Wakkanai……well you obviously don’t know me well enough…..I really am that stupid…. 😦
I’m sure you already know that End-to-End rides are all about earning a ‘gong’ at the end….but the only ‘gong’ awaiting you is not a reception committee waving flags and throwing streamers, but simply to have your photo taken at the finishing line

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……thank the person who kindly took the photo (in this case a young Japanese couple who wanted to have their photo taken with me……ah, the problems of celebrity!) and go and find yourself a coffee (or something stronger) to celebrate.
Well, I looked around and couldn’t see anything that might serve me coffee, or anything else for that matter. In fact, during this down-period between the winter and summer seasons, businesses go into hibernation. I headed up the high street of this tiny frontier village….everywhere was lifeless…..except for a tiny food store.
Watching out for empty boxes on the floor (bad joke!), I went in, purchased a pot noodle, asked the lady to fill it with hot water, and prepared to head outside to eat it when…..(and here comes another ‘only in Japan’ moment)…the lady said something I didn’t understand, but her body language implied I could go through to their house and eat in some warmth and comfort, sitting at their kitchen table.
Now remember, in the shop I was just a paying customer, sitting in her kitchen I suddenly became her guest (change of status)…..so along with my pot noodle, she served me some sweet omelette, made me a cup of coffee…..and when I left she gave me one of the gift pens from her shop. I was touched. And she then did the very Japanese thing of waving me off, until I had disappeared around the corner.
In a memorial park nearby, with commanding views of the Cape,

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there were a variety of monuments, amongst them this memorial to the sinking of the American submarine Wahoo SS 238 in 1943, which had been responsible for destroying a lot of Japanese shipping, killing hundreds.

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The memorial, however, is dedicated to the dead on both sides…..a post-war gesture that bids to nurture permanent peace between the two countries.

And for those who like a few post-ride statistics: I originally estimated this to be a 3000km ride between the two Capes, but I have personally clocked up 3074km, some of it additional because of sight-seeing, going off route….etc.
At my average pace of 120-130km per day, excluding all sight-seeing and stopovers, as a straight ride it would take just four weeks to complete. And if you want a little more warmth and less wind, (but you’d miss the cherry blossom), May would be a better month. By the time you get to Hokkaido in late May/early June, the campsites would likely be open, and the weather more pleasantly warm.

However, my journey is not quite over yet. After a rest day tomorrow, I’ll catch a ferry, and spend a couple of nights on the remote islands of Ristri and Rebun, as I did on Stewart Island, at the finish of my End-to-End of New Zealand two years ago.
Ristri has a Mt Fuji look-alike volcano dominating the entire circular island, and both islands (because of their Siberian aspect) have a high alpine climate, even at sea level. Certainly not time to be ‘casting the clouts’ yet!

About Frank Burns

My journeys around the world are less about riding a bicycle, and more about what happens when I get off the bicycle. Click on the Personal Link below to visit my webpages.

Posted on April 23, 2015, in End-to-End of Japan 3000kms and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink. 23 Comments.

  1. Congratulations on reaching Cape Soya, Frank! Enjoy Rishiri and Rebun, and safe journey home!

    (With no excess baggage charges for your bike, I hope!)

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  2. Well done Frank! 🙂 Have enjoyed following you along the way.

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  3. Thanks Andy…..paid a visit to the airport to pave the way for the bike….details in next post.

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  4. Thanks for your company along the way! Keep ‘working those pedals’…..

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  5. Denise McAdam

    Well done, Frank! Another feather in your cap; congratulations! It’s been a pleasure to read your recollections of your end to end ride through Japan. Enjoy Ristri and Rebun, safe journey home and see you when you get back. In abrazo. :mrgreen:

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  6. Thanks Denise! …..and only spoken Spanish once throughout my journey…….

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  7. congratulations on a fascinating trip and thank you so much for taking us with you. As always safe journey home and look forward to the slide show of what really happened!

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  8. ¡Felicidades!

    Have you thought about writing up some of your journeys as books?

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  9. Thanks David…..you are the kind of ‘cheer leader’ a guy like me needs….

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  10. Many times Andrew…..but every time the urge comes upon me, I climb on the bike till it disappears….. 🙂

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  11. Congratulations – as with your last tour, your audience has shared your highs and lows along the route (albeit that when we felt for you in the rain we were ourselves not cold and wet). Well done and thank you for another fascinating story. Now you need to hand the baton to James (http://selfpropelled.life/) and his travelling lobster…

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  12. Thanks for your company on this venture…..and very happy to pass the baton……well, till the next time….:)

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  13. Graham Peace

    Congratulations Frank. I thoroughly enjoyed following your journey albeit from the comfort of my office chair in Stonely. You really have some heartwarming tales to tell and I feel a little bit more knowledgeable about a land and its people thanks to your pedalling.. Have a safe trip back.
    Best wishes
    Graham

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  14. Congratulations Frank. I love the photo at the finish. Well done.

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  15. Thanks Graham…..and thanks once again for your company on this trip!

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  16. Thanks! We only do these things for the final photo……..?

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  17. The celebrity celebrates, love it!

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  18. The Japanese Bluff – a lot of similarities by the look of it. Great write ups, extremely jealous.

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  19. And thanks for your company on this journey…..

    Liked by 1 person

  20. Thanks Kevin……now looking forward to catching up with your posts….reading other peoples’ blogs gets neglected on these journeys.

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  21. Congratulations on achieving your goal. What do you have planned for your next trip? I thoroughly enjoy being a traveller through your eyes. Thanks for sharing.

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  22. Thanks Heather! And next? Any suggestions?

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  23. Not really. I look forward to seeing what you come up with.

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