The odyssey begins……

CIMG8017After 35 hours of travelling, 48 hours without sleep of any sort, I stepped off the final flight on the tiny airstrip of Kaitaia, the nearest to Cape Reinga, and the start of my end-to-end of New Zealand. Getting off a 19 seat de Haviland is like getting off a bus or train, and the terminal building is little more than a pre-fabricated shelter. An hour later, the bike was re-assembled, the airport manager helpfully discarded the empty box, and a fellow passenger chats and watches me complete the task.

The sign I will be carrying on the back of the bike, advertising the purpose ofCIMG8014 the ride, has already attracted attention, and the readiness of Kiwis to donate to the cause I find both endearing and uplifting. I read somewhere that New Zealanders are the world’s most generous donors to charitable causes. My first few hours in the country are testament to that.

My task was to get out to Cape Reinga, 124 km from the CIMG8027hostel I stayed in on my first night. Lack of sleep, irregular eating patterns, the inactivity of flying and the humidity of the northern NZ climate all prove to be inauspicious. No local bus company could take me and my bike out to the starting point, so it was up to me. After more than 100 km (about 65 miles), just 21 km short of my target, I called it a day, camped in Waitiki Landing, was driven out of my tent by a swarm of mosquitoes, continued sleeping on a couch in a TV room, then tackled the final kms the next day. And was I glad I didn’t tackle them the day before……steep hills and a stiff head wind coming off the Pacific, made the approach to the Cape very challenging. But at the end of this narrow peninsula was the lighthouse, a feature drawing coachloads of visitors and convoys of 4×4 safari

Jasmine,Robert & Lars: good samaritans

Jasmine,Robert & Lars: good samaritans

drivers to a spot that is venerated by the Maori as the departure point of the spirits of the dead, heading off for there final place of rest. Such is the veneration that you won’t find a shop, cafe or information kiosk, and people are asked not to eat or drink in the vicinity.

With this stage of the ride completed, albeit in reverse, I was very happy to accept a lift from three young German engineers, driving an elderly campervan which they had rented in Christchurch and were touring both islands. Jasmine, Robert and Lars were fascinated by my venture, and waved me off with a donation of  NZ$20 to the cause. In all, I reckon I have collected over 50 GBP from passers-by who see my sign and are moved to put a hand in their pocket and make a spontaneous donation.

I am so glad the Kiwis are amongst the most generous people in the world!

Please support the Children in Syria

For more cycling-related topics, visit: Love Cycling

About Frank Burns

My journeys around the world are less about riding a bicycle, and more about what happens when I get off the bicycle. Click on the Personal Link below to visit my webpages.

Posted on January 23, 2013, in New Zealand End-to-End 3000kms and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 20 Comments.

  1. Good luck with your journey. It will be interesting to follow you as you move through NZ…

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  2. Good luck with your trip Frank!

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  3. Frank, I’m delighted to be, apparently, the first to be able to respond to your opening NZ blog.. The Worthing Branch wish you every joy on your adventure. Vaya con Dios.

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  4. Frank, best wishes for your trip, and stay safe!

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  5. Inspirational, as always!

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  6. Well done, great start 100km after no sleep you must be aching all over! Hope the mosquitoes haven’t left any itchy spots and the wind is behind you for the next few days. xxx

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  7. Sheila Cakebread

    Glad you made it, Frank & weren’t thwarted by the snow! Good luck!

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  8. Thanks Jen. No visible damage done by the wretched mozzies. But the wonders of smart phones…..I’m writing this sitting outside the tent….

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  9. Good luck on the trip! The sign looks great, a superb idea, where did you get the sign from?

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  10. Local sign maker donated it. People are responding to it all the time.

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  11. Godspeed, my friend! Thanks for posting the donation link. It’s really wonderful for you to do this for such a great cause. Enjoy the voyage!

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  12. Thanks Aaron, and thanks for the kind donation!

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  13. Thanks, wish I could have given more. Very supportive of the cause.

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  14. Hi Frank, Welcome to my country. If you are still in Northland let me know as you are welcome to stay with us. We’re an hour north of Auckland. You are going to find the North Island very hilly. Good luck with the cycling.

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  15. Thanks for that kind offer. I am now in Auckland, and due to take the ferry over to Coromandel tomorrow.
    You are right, North Island is hilly!

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  16. I can see the hills of the Coromandel from my house, you would have been well acquainted with them by now 🙂 We have prayed for you to have a good journey on our NZ roads.

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  17. That’s a kind thought. Thanks!

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  18. Good post! We are linking to this particularly great post on our site.
    Keep up the great writing.

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  19. Thanks. Appreciate that!

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